Using Keepass under ChromeOS with Android app KeePassDroid (read/write)

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On my Windows machine and Ubuntu laptop I use KeePass and KeePassX for working with my KeePass (.kdbx). I keep the database in the cloud for convenience. When I got my Chromebook I first started using a Chrome browser extension called CKP – KeePass integration for Chrome. It is very convenient in the way that it always sits in you Chrome toolbar and suggests you which entry you are looking for depending on the tab you have currently open (it does a pretty good job) and then offers to autofill in the credentials. This is all fine, but it lack the abilty to add an entry to the database. Again, there is a solution in the Android Play store for this, if you own a ChromeOS device that can run Android apps.

KeePassDroid

If you have an Android capable chrome device – mine is an Acer Chromebook R11, but all 2017 chrome devices are Android capable – open the Google Play Store and install KeePassDroid. If you have your kdbx file in the cloud you will need to install the app for this respective service as well. So for Google Drive for instance install the Google Drive Android app. Now, if you want to be able to write to the kdbx file it is important (see this bug report for details) that you open the kdbx file via the Android Google Drive app, it will ask you to open it with KeePassDroid, confirm and type you password.

That’s all, you are ready to go.

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One Response to Using Keepass under ChromeOS with Android app KeePassDroid (read/write)

  1. Mike Browne says:

    Hi. This was the only thing that was stopping me from purchasing a Chromebook. I use Keepass to store my passwords and other things but then encrypt them (Client side) with Crytopmator (another Android app) prior to storing the whole encrypted container on Dropbox. This way my passwords are not entrusted in plaintext to someone like LastPass who then encrypts them after they’ve been over the web in plaintext. They’re encrypted my end and then all the way. The same can be said of any documents too that you put on Dropbox.

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